Fancy Color Research Foundation

Post-Auction Impressions: Sotheby’s Hong Kong

Noticeable discrepancies between live and in person auction house diamonds can create a bit of controversy. When a customer buys a high quality, fairly priced stone in retail and later sees what appears to be a comparable stone in an auction catalogue for a significantly lower price, it disappoints the owner.
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Defining “Not Applicable”

After conducting a small survey among diamond wholesalers, we recognized an uncertainty in the trade regarding the term “Not Applicable”, which appears on GIA fancy color reports. Collectively, wholesalers felt that this term does not express a desirable attribute – but they could not clearly explain its implications.
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Using the Right ‘Tool Box’

Whether you are a diamond dealer or a sales person in a jewelry store, the 4C’s system is the first and only methodology used for classifying colorless diamonds. Efficient and easy to employ, each category in the system has its own hierarchy. Once its basic principles are understood, anyone can evaluate a colorless diamond accompanied with a report.
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‘Bubbles’ in Diamonds?

Although this article does not discuss fancy color diamonds it is a relevant topic for all diamond industry professionals, as this phenomenon is very common in fancy color, particularly in pink diamonds.
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Not My ‘Type’: Common Misconceptions About Type IIa Pink Diamonds

The romance around Type IIa diamonds first began when scientists found a link between diamonds sourced from the legendary Golconda mine in India and the fact that stones hailing from this area were commonly Type IIa. As we all know by now, the collective assumption is that Type IIa diamonds – which are distinguished for their absence of nitrogen – are known to be more ‘white’ than most D color diamonds.
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Post-Auction Impressions: October 07th 2015, Sotheby’s Hong Kong

Noticeable discrepancies between live and in person auction house diamonds can create a bit of controversy. When a customer buys a high quality, fairly priced stone in retail and later sees what appears to be a comparable stone in an auction catalogue for a significantly lower price, it disappoints the owner.
Read more

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